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Political correctness gets in the way of common sense in attacks against college Christian groups

The modern American college experience has been turning into a completely secular concept for decades and the indoctrination of anti-religious worldviews has been openly pervasive for years. It’s going even further lately. Now, Christian groups are expected to allow non-Christians to lead them.

When it comes to fraternities, they’re not required to allow women to lead them. When it comes to particular racial college organizations, they’re not required to allow people of different races to lead them. Political organizations such as Young Democrats do not require allowing a Republican to lead. With Chi Alpha, a collegiate Christian organization, many schools are requiring that they allow non-Christians to lead the chapters.

Crazy, I know. It’s not just about the profane usage of political correctness to attack anything that doesn’t suit the liberal narrative. It’s the attack on common sense that should infuriate everyone. A Christian group should expect their leaders to be Christian just as a feminist group should expect their leaders to be feminists. Chi Alpha is being told by some schools to allow non-Christian leaders while the Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance isn’t being told to allow non-feminist leaders. Common sense says that both should be allowed to filter their leadership through the lens of the beliefs they espouse, but common sense is only allowed for liberal groups.

This isn’t a matter of discrimination, bigotry, or moral superiority, charges often levied on Christian groups in and out of schools. This is a situation that’s squarely anchored by the reverse discrimination making its way across much of American society with colleges and universities as the primary battlegrounds.

One doesn’t have to be a Christian to recognize the hypocrisy at play on campuses across the country.

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